How does a 2018 Honda Civic Sedan compare to its competition in Safety Near San Antonio, TX?

Honda Civic Sedan

Compared To Mitsubishi Mirage 2018

The Civic offers optional Collision Mitigation Braking System, which use forward mounted sensors to warn the driver of a possible collision ahead. If the driver doesn’t react and the system determines a collision is imminent, it automatically applies the brakes at full-force in order to reduce the force of the crash or avoid it altogether. The Mirage doesn\'t offer collision warning or crash mitigation brakes.

The Honda Civic has Daytime Running Lights to help keep it more visible under all conditions. Canadian government studies show that driving with lights during the day reduces accidents by 11% by making vehicles more conspicuous. The Mirage doesn’t offer Daytime Running Lights.

The Civic’s optional lane departure warning system alerts a temporarily inattentive driver when the vehicle begins to leave its lane and gently nudges the vehicle back towards its lane. The Mirage doesn’t offer a lane departure warning system.

The Civic’s blind spot mirrors use wide-angle convex mirrors mounted in the corner of each side view mirror to reveal objects that may be in the driver’s blind spots. The Mirage doesn’t offer a system to reveal objects in the driver’s blind spots.

The Civic EX/EX-T/EX-L/Touring has standard HondaLink Assist, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The Mirage doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies, so if you’re involved in an accident and you’re incapacitated help may not come as quickly.

Both the Civic and the Mirage have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front wheel drive, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding and rearview cameras.

The Honda Civic weighs 545 to 992 pounds more than the Mitsubishi Mirage. The NHTSA advises that heavier cars are much safer in collisions than their significantly lighter counterparts. Crosswinds also affect lighter cars more.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does 35 MPH front crash tests on new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Honda Civic is safer than the Mitsubishi Mirage:
CivicMirage
OVERALL STARS5 Stars4 Stars
Driver
STARS5 Stars4 Stars
HIC201362
Neck Injury Risk20%40%
Neck Stress176 lbs.435 lbs.
Neck Compression53 lbs.68 lbs.
Leg Forces (l/r)192/350 lbs.291/454 lbs.
Passenger
STARS5 Stars4 Stars
HIC265307
Neck Injury Risk34%43%
Neck Stress131 lbs.204 lbs.
Neck Compression46 lbs.203 lbs.
New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

A significantly tougher test than their original offset frontal crash test, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety does 40 MPH small overlap frontal offset crash tests. In this test, where only 25% of the total width of the vehicle is struck, results indicate that the Honda Civic Sedan is safer than the Mirage Hatchback:
CivicMirage
Overall EvaluationGOODMARGINAL
RestraintsGOODMARGINAL
Chest EvaluationGOODGOOD
Max Chest Compression21 cm21 cm
Hip & Thigh EvaluationGOODGOOD
Femur Force R/L.2/.5kN4.9/1.8kN
Hip & Thigh Injury Risk R/L0%/0%3%/0%
Lower Leg EvalutionACCEPTABLEPOOR
Tibia index R/L.51/.991.87/.8
The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does side impact tests on new vehicles. In this test, which crashes the vehicle into a flat barrier at 38.5 MPH and into a post at 20 MPH, results indicate that the Honda Civic is safer than the Mitsubishi Mirage:
CivicMirage
Front Seat
STARS5 Stars5 Stars
Chest Movement1 inch1 inch
Abdominal Force252 G's252 G's
Hip Force306 lbs.519 lbs.
Rear Seat
STARS5 Stars5 Stars
Spine Acceleration68 G's79 G's
Hip Force356 lbs.959 lbs.
Into Pole
STARS5 Stars5 Stars
Max Damage Depth12 inches13 inches
Spine Acceleration37 G's50 G's
Hip Force727 lbs.970 lbs.
New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

For its top level performance in all IIHS frontal, side, rear impact and roof-crush tests, and with its optional front crash prevention system, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety grants the Civic the rating of “Top Pick” for 2017, a rating granted to only 120 vehicles tested by the IIHS. The Mirage was not even a “Top Pick” for 2016.

Compared To Subaru BRZ 2018

For enhanced safety, the front seat shoulder belts of the Honda Civic Sedan/Hatchback are height-adjustable to accommodate a wide variety of driver and passenger heights. A better fit can prevent injuries and the increased comfort also encourages passengers to buckle up. The Subaru BRZ doesn’t offer height-adjustable seat belts.

The Civic offers optional Collision Mitigation Braking System, which use forward mounted sensors to warn the driver of a possible collision ahead. If the driver doesn’t react and the system determines a collision is imminent, it automatically applies the brakes at full-force in order to reduce the force of the crash or avoid it altogether. The BRZ doesn\'t offer collision warning or crash mitigation brakes.

The Civic’s optional lane departure warning system alerts a temporarily inattentive driver when the vehicle begins to leave its lane and gently nudges the vehicle back towards its lane. The BRZ doesn’t offer a lane departure warning system.

The Civic’s blind spot mirrors use wide-angle convex mirrors mounted in the corner of each side view mirror to reveal objects that may be in the driver’s blind spots. The BRZ doesn’t offer a system to reveal objects in the driver’s blind spots.

The Civic EX/EX-T/EX-L/Touring has standard HondaLink Assist, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The BRZ doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies, so if you’re involved in an accident and you’re incapacitated help may not come as quickly.

Both the Civic and the BRZ have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, daytime running lights and rearview cameras.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does 35 MPH front crash tests on new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Honda Civic is safer than the Subaru BRZ:
CivicBRZ
OVERALL STARS5 Stars4 Stars
Driver
STARS5 Stars4 Stars
Neck Injury Risk20%25%
Neck Stress176 lbs.263 lbs.
Leg Forces (l/r)192/350 lbs.814/1004 lbs.
Passenger
STARS5 Stars4 Stars
HIC265361
Chest Compression.6 inches.6 inches
Neck Stress131 lbs.135 lbs.
Neck Compression46 lbs.92 lbs.
Leg Forces (l/r)445/224 lbs.470/406 lbs.
New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

A significantly tougher test than their original offset frontal crash test, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety does 40 MPH small overlap frontal offset crash tests. In this test, where only 25% of the total width of the vehicle is struck, results indicate that the Honda Civic Sedan is safer than the BRZ:
CivicBRZ
Overall EvaluationGOODACCEPTABLE
RestraintsGOODACCEPTABLE
Chest EvaluationGOODGOOD
Max Chest Compression21 cm22 cm
Hip & Thigh EvaluationGOODGOOD
Femur Force R/L.2/.5kN4.5/1.6kN
Hip & Thigh Injury Risk R/L0%/0%2%/0%
Lower Leg EvaluationACCEPTABLEACCEPTABLE
The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does side impact tests on new vehicles. In this test, which crashes the vehicle into a flat barrier at 38.5 MPH, results indicate that the Honda Civic is safer than the Subaru BRZ:
CivicBRZ
Front Seat
STARS5 Stars3 Stars
New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

For its top level performance in all IIHS frontal, side, rear impact and roof-crush tests, and with its optional front crash prevention system, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety grants the Civic the rating of “Top Pick” for 2017, a rating granted to only 120 vehicles tested by the IIHS. The BRZ was not even a “Top Pick” for 2016.

Compared To Hyundai Elantra Sedan 2018

Both the Civic and the Elantra Sedan have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front wheel drive, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, daytime running lights, available crash mitigating brakes and lane departure warning systems.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does 35 MPH front crash tests on new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Honda Civic is safer than the Hyundai Elantra Sedan:
CivicElantra Sedan
OVERALL STARS5 Stars4 Stars
Driver
STARS5 Stars4 Stars
Passenger
STARS5 Stars4 Stars
New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

Compared To Chevrolet Camaro 2018

For enhanced safety, the front seat shoulder belts of the Honda Civic Sedan/Hatchback are height-adjustable to accommodate a wide variety of driver and passenger heights. A better fit can prevent injuries and the increased comfort also encourages passengers to buckle up. The Chevrolet Camaro doesn’t offer height-adjustable seat belts.

The Civic offers optional Collision Mitigation Braking System, which use forward mounted sensors to warn the driver of a possible collision ahead. If the driver doesn’t react and the system determines a collision is imminent, it automatically applies the brakes at full-force in order to reduce the force of the crash or avoid it altogether. The Camaro doesn\'t offer collision warning or crash mitigation brakes.

The Civic’s optional lane departure warning system alerts a temporarily inattentive driver when the vehicle begins to leave its lane and gently nudges the vehicle back towards its lane. The Camaro doesn’t offer a lane departure warning system.

Both the Civic and the Camaro have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, daytime running lights and rearview cameras.

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) performs roof strength tests. In that test the Civic earned the top rating of “Good” because its roof supported over four times the Civic’s weight before being crushed five inches. The Camaro was rated lower at “Acceptable.”

For its top level performance in all IIHS frontal, side, rear impact and roof-crush tests, and with its optional front crash prevention system, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety grants the Civic the rating of “Top Pick” for 2017, a rating granted to only 120 vehicles tested by the IIHS. The Camaro was not even a “Top Pick” for 2016.

Compared To Mazda 3 2018

Both the Civic and the Mazda 3 have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front wheel drive, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, daytime running lights, rearview cameras, available crash mitigating brakes and lane departure warning systems.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does 35 MPH front crash tests on new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Honda Civic is safer than the Mazda 3:
CivicMazda3
Driver
STARS5 Stars5 Stars
Neck Injury Risk20%20%
Neck Stress176 lbs.232 lbs.
Neck Compression53 lbs.70 lbs.
Passenger
STARS5 Stars4 Stars
Neck Injury Risk34%48%
Neck Stress131 lbs.213 lbs.
Neck Compression46 lbs.78 lbs.
New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does side impact tests on new vehicles. In this test, which crashes the vehicle into a flat barrier at 38.5 MPH and into a post at 20 MPH, results indicate that the Honda Civic is safer than the Mazda 3:
CivicMazda3
Front Seat
STARS5 Stars4 Stars
HIC204245
Chest Movement1 inch1.3 inches
Abdominal Force252 G's276 G's
Hip Force306 lbs.465 lbs.
Rear Seat
STARS5 Stars5 Stars
Spine Acceleration68 G's72 G's
Hip Force356 lbs.575 lbs.
Into Pole
STARS5 Stars5 Stars
Max Damage Depth12 inches14 inches
HIC260269
New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

Compared To Kia Rio 2017

The Civic offers optional Collision Mitigation Braking System, which use forward mounted sensors to warn the driver of a possible collision ahead. If the driver doesn’t react and the system determines a collision is imminent, it automatically applies the brakes at full-force in order to reduce the force of the crash or avoid it altogether. The Rio doesn\'t offer collision warning or crash mitigation brakes.

The Civic’s optional lane departure warning system alerts a temporarily inattentive driver when the vehicle begins to leave its lane and gently nudges the vehicle back towards its lane. The Rio doesn’t offer a lane departure warning system.

The Civic’s blind spot mirrors use wide-angle convex mirrors mounted in the corner of each side view mirror to reveal objects that may be in the driver’s blind spots. The Rio doesn’t offer a system to reveal objects in the driver’s blind spots.

Compared to metal, the Civic’s plastic fuel tank can withstand harder, more intrusive impacts without leaking; this decreases the possibility of fire. The Kia Rio has a metal gas tank.

The Civic EX/EX-T/EX-L/Touring has standard HondaLink Assist, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The Rio doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies, so if you’re involved in an accident and you’re incapacitated help may not come as quickly.

Both the Civic and the Rio have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front wheel drive, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control and electronic stability systems to prevent skidding.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does 35 MPH front crash tests on new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Honda Civic is safer than the Kia Rio:
CivicRio
OVERALL STARS5 Stars4 Stars
Driver
STARS5 Stars4 Stars
HIC201318
Neck Injury Risk20%31%
Neck Stress176 lbs.410 lbs.
Neck Compression53 lbs.75 lbs.
Leg Forces (l/r)192/350 lbs.572/327 lbs.
Passenger
STARS5 Stars4 Stars
HIC265427
Neck Injury Risk34%46%
Neck Stress131 lbs.139 lbs.
Neck Compression46 lbs.99 lbs.
New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

A significantly tougher test than their original offset frontal crash test, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety does 40 MPH small overlap frontal offset crash tests. In this test, where only 25% of the total width of the vehicle is struck, results indicate that the Honda Civic Sedan is safer than the Rio:
CivicRio
Overall EvaluationGOODMARGINAL
RestraintsGOODMARGINAL
Steering Column Movement Rearward0 cm6 cm
Chest EvaluationGOODGOOD
Max Chest Compression21 cm24 cm
Hip & Thigh EvaluationGOODGOOD
Femur Force R/L.2/.5 kN3.6/1.6kN
Hip & Thigh Injury Risk R/L0%/0%1%/0%
Lower Leg EvaluationACCEPTABLEPOOR
Tibia index R/L.51/.991.41/.54
The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does side impact tests on new vehicles. In this test, which crashes the vehicle into a flat barrier at 38.5 MPH and into a post at 20 MPH, results indicate that the Honda Civic is safer than the Kia Rio:
CivicRio
Front Seat
STARS5 Stars4 Stars
HIC204307
Chest Movement1 inch1.3 inches
Abdominal Force252 G's327 G's
Hip Force306 lbs.429 lbs.
Rear Seat
STARS5 Stars5 Stars
Spine Acceleration68 G's85 G's
Hip Force356 lbs.847 lbs.
Into Pole
STARS5 Stars5 Stars
Max Damage Depth12 inches14 inches
HIC260286
Spine Acceleration37 G's45 G's
New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

In a 31 MPH side-impact test, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety crashes a 3300 pound sled into the side of new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Honda Civic Sedan is safer than the Rio:
CivicRio
Overall EvaluationGOODACCEPTABLE
StructureGOODACCEPTABLE
Driver
Head Protection RatingGOODGOOD
Head Injury RatingGOODGOOD
Torso Injury RatingGOODMARGINAL
Pelvis/Leg Injury RatingGOODGOOD
Head Injury Criterion299320
Shoulder Movement33 mm46 mm
Rear Passenger
Head Protection RatingGOODGOOD
Head Injury RatingGOODGOOD
Torso Injury RatingGOODGOOD
For its top level performance in all IIHS frontal, side, rear impact and roof-crush tests, and with its optional front crash prevention system, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety grants the Civic the rating of “Top Pick” for 2017, a rating granted to only 120 vehicles tested by the IIHS. The Rio was not even a “Top Pick” for 2016.

Compared To Toyota Corolla 2018

The Civic’s blind spot mirrors use wide-angle convex mirrors mounted in the corner of each side view mirror to reveal objects that may be in the driver’s blind spots. The Corolla doesn’t offer a system to reveal objects in the driver’s blind spots.

The Civic EX/EX-T/EX-L/Touring has standard HondaLink Assist, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The Corolla doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies, so if you’re involved in an accident and you’re incapacitated help may not come as quickly.

Both the Civic and the Corolla have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front wheel drive, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, daytime running lights, rearview cameras, available crash mitigating brakes and lane departure warning systems.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does 35 MPH front crash tests on new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Honda Civic is safer than the Toyota Corolla:
CivicCorolla
Driver
STARS5 Stars5 Stars
HIC201212
Neck Injury Risk20%26%
Neck Stress176 lbs.362 lbs.
Leg Forces (l/r)192/350 lbs.314/513 lbs.
Passenger
STARS5 Stars4 Stars
Neck Injury Risk34%41%
Neck Compression46 lbs.78 lbs.
New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does side impact tests on new vehicles. In this test, which crashes the vehicle into a flat barrier at 38.5 MPH and into a post at 20 MPH, results indicate that the Honda Civic is safer than the Toyota Corolla:
CivicCorolla
Front Seat
STARS5 Stars5 Stars
Hip Force306 lbs.412 lbs.
Rear Seat
STARS5 Stars5 Stars
Spine Acceleration68 G's70 G's
Hip Force356 lbs.765 lbs.
Into Pole
STARS5 Stars5 Stars
Max Damage Depth12 inches13 inches
Hip Force727 lbs.868 lbs.
New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.

Compared To MINI Cooper Hardtop 2 Door 2018

For enhanced safety, the front seat shoulder belts of the Honda Civic Sedan/Hatchback are height-adjustable to accommodate a wide variety of driver and passenger heights. A better fit can prevent injuries and the increased comfort also encourages passengers to buckle up. The MINI Cooper Hardtop 2 Door doesn’t offer height-adjustable seat belts.

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety tests front crash prevention systems. With a score of 6 points, IIHS rates the Collision Mitigation Braking System optional in the Civic as “Superior.” The Cooper Hardtop 2 Door scores only 4 points and is rated only “Advanced.”

The Civic’s optional lane departure warning system alerts a temporarily inattentive driver when the vehicle begins to leave its lane and gently nudges the vehicle back towards its lane. The Cooper Hardtop 2 Door doesn’t offer a lane departure warning system.

The Civic’s blind spot mirrors use wide-angle convex mirrors mounted in the corner of each side view mirror to reveal objects that may be in the driver’s blind spots. The Cooper Hardtop 2 Door doesn’t offer a system to reveal objects in the driver’s blind spots.

The Civic EX/EX-T/EX-L/Touring has standard HondaLink Assist, which uses a global positioning satellite (GPS) receiver and a cellular system to send emergency personnel to the scene if any airbags deploy. The Cooper Hardtop 2 Door doesn’t offer a GPS response system, only a navigation computer with no live response for emergencies, so if you’re involved in an accident and you’re incapacitated help may not come as quickly.

Both the Civic and the Cooper Hardtop 2 Door have standard driver and passenger frontal airbags, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head airbags, front seatbelt pretensioners, front wheel drive, plastic fuel tanks, four-wheel antilock brakes, traction control, electronic stability systems to prevent skidding, daytime running lights and rearview cameras.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does 35 MPH front crash tests on new vehicles. In this test, results indicate that the Honda Civic is safer than the MINI Cooper Hardtop 2 Door:
CivicCooper
OVERALL STARS5 Stars4 Stars
Driver
STARS5 Stars4 Stars
Neck Injury Risk20%36%
Neck Stress176 lbs.318 lbs.
Neck Compression53 lbs.60 lbs.
Leg Forces (l/r)192/350 lbs.261/454 lbs.
Passenger
STARS5 Stars5 Stars
Chest Compression.6 inches.6 inches
Neck Injury Risk34%37%
Neck Stress131 lbs.225 lbs.
Neck Compression46 lbs.53 lbs.
New test not comparable to pre-2011 test results. More stars = Better. Lower test results = Better.